Estrella WarBirds Museum

© 1990-2014 | 501(c)3 Tax ID 77-0324714

Estrella Warbirds Museum Welcomes You! Come Visit Us

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Estrella Warbirds Museum is one of the fastest growing museums in CA


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There is always plenty to do and see at Estrella Warbirds Museum whether you are 3 or 93!


"Warbirds Over Paso" Air Show
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Armament & Ordnance


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Aircraft at the museum can be privately owned and on display, on loan from military organizations or belong to Estrella Warbirds Museum


Watch this space for upcoming additions!

Welcome to the Woodland Family Automobile Display


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Note: In order to keep the displays looking fresh, some of the listed vehicles may be temporarily cycled out for maintenance, on loan, or to make room for other vehicles.

Missiles On DIsplay at Estrella Warbirds Museum


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Vehicles on display are frame up restorations. Got talent? We've got more to do.


Got Questions? Contact Us! Our vehicle displays are always changing. You will find something new with each visit.

Estrella Warbirds Museum is one of the fastest growing museums in CA

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1944 Willys Jeep

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US MC

1/4 Ton
S/N 884430


A classic example of the early-WWII Army Jeep, this one mounting a .50-cal Browning machine gun that has been converted to operate with acetylene, but in noise only -- the barrel is plugged. This is one of the EWM restored vehicles which represents the Estrella WarBirds Museum in local community events.

The first jeep prototype (the Bantam BRC) was built for the Department of the Army by American Bantam in Butler, Pennsylvania, followed by two other competing prototypes produced by Ford and Willys-Overland. The American Bantam Car Company actually built and designed the vehicle that first met the Army's criteria, but its engine did not meet the Army's torque requirements. Plus, the Army felt that the company was too small to supply the number needed and it allowed Willys and Ford to make second attempts on their designs after seeing Bantam's vehicle in action. Some people believe that Ford and Willys also had access to Bantam's technical paperwork.

Quantities 1500 of each of the three models were then extensively field tested. During the bidding process for 16,000 "jeeps", Willys-Overland offered the lowest bid and won the initial contract. Willys thus designed what would become the standardized jeep, designating it a model MB military vehicle and building it at their plant in Toledo, Ohio.

Like American Bantam, Willys-Overland was a small company and, likewise, the military was concerned about their ability to produce large quantities of jeeps. The military was also concerned that Willys-Overland had only one manufacturing facility: something that would make the supply of jeeps more susceptible to sabotage or production stoppages.

Based on these two concerns, the U.S. government required that jeeps also be built by the Ford Motor Company, who designated the vehicle as model GPW (G = governmental vehicle, P showed the wheelbase, and W = the Willys design). Willys and Ford, under the direction of Charles E. Sorensen (Vice-President of Ford during World War II), produced more than 600,000 jeeps. Besides just being a "truck" the jeep was used for as many purposes as you can think of.

The jeep was widely copied around the world, including in France by Hotchkiss et Cie (after 1954, Hotchkiss manufactured Jeeps under licence from Willys), and by Nekaf in the Netherlands. There were several versions created, including a railway jeep and an amphibious jeep. As part of the war effort, Jeeps were also supplied to the Soviet Red Army during World War II.

In the United States military, the jeep has been supplanted by a number of vehicles (e.g. Ford's M151 MUTT) of which the latest is the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or "Humvee").

Loaned to the Museum by Gary Corippo. Manufactured by Willys Automobile Company, Detroit MI.










Height: 72"
Length: 131"
Width: 62"
Weight:  
Engine:  
Horsepower:  
Max Payload : 800 lbs
Max towable Payload: 1000 lbs
Tires:  
Fuel Type : 68 min. octane
Fuel Capacity:  
Crew: 1 + 3
Range:  
Status: Active Static Display  
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